NEWS



Dr Aaron W. Hunter
BSc (Hons), MSc, PhD, FLS, FGS

University of Cambridge

Evolutionary Palaeoecologist

 

Contact Information:

Visiting Post Doctoral Researcher
Department of Earth Sciences
University of Cambridge
Downing Street
Cambridge
CB2 3EQ

Email: Aaron Hunter

Website
: www.afossilhunter.com

LinkedIn: Aaron W. Hunter

Twitter:

Aaron Hunter




 


Current Research Interests:

Evolutionary palaeoecology of marine invertebrates, specializing in Asterozoa (Starfish & Brittle-Stars and Crinoidia (Sea Lillies). Current projects range from the Lower Ordovician to the Late Neogene. Please view My RESEARCH for more information.

 

Future Talks/Presentations:

Fri 6th Dec. 2019 - Geologists' Association

Please contact me if you would like me to give a talk to your group/department

 

Recent Talks:

Mon 8th Apr. 2019 - Bath Mayor's Guides

Thurs 1st Nov. 2018 - Bath Geological Society

Wed 2nd Oct. 2018 - Bristol Naturalists' Society

Wed 29th Nov. 2017 - Bristol Naturalists' Society Geology

 
 
Media & Journal covers:
 
Reid M., Taylor W.L., Brett C.E., Hunter, A.W. & Bordy E.M: Taphonomy and paleoecology of an ophiuroid-stylophoran obrution deposit from the lower Devonian Bokkeveld Group, South Africa. Palaios, 34 pp. 212-228. DOI: 10.2110/palo.2018.048
 

PALAIOS COVER: Vol 34 April 2019:

 
 

Rowan J. Whittle, Aaron W. Hunter, David J. Cantrill, Kenneth J. McNamara: Globally discordant Isocrinida (Crinoidea) migration confirms asynchronous Marine Mesozoic Revolution. Nature Communications Biology 1, Article 46. DIO: 10.1038/s42003-018-0048-0 OPEN ACCESS

- Cambridge Earth Sciences: Major shift in marine life occurred 33 million years later.

- BAS Press Release: Major shift in marine life occurred 33 million years later.

- UWA Research News: Fossil discovery paints new picture of the history of our ocean.

- ABC News: Fossil find of 33-million-year-old sea lilies in outback WA challenges major palaeontology theory.

- IFL Science!: A child's discovery could rewrite millions of years of marine evolution.

- Geology Page: Major shift in marine life occurred 33 million years later.

- Science Daily: Major shift in marine life occurred 33 million years later.

- Science Newsline: Major shift in marine life occurred 33 million years later.

- EurekaAlert: Major shift in marine life occurred 33 million years later.

- Scienmag Science Magazine: Major shift in marine life occurred 33 million years later.

   

           
 
 

Aaron W. Hunter & Kenneth J. McNamara: Prolonged co–existence of ‘archaic’ and ‘modern’ Palaeozoic ophiuroids – Evidence from the Early Permian, Southern Carnarvon Basin, Western Australia. Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. In Press. DOI: 10.1080/14772019.2017.1353549

- The Conversation: Dancing brittle stars tell an ancient tale of life and death in brutal seas.

- University of Cambridge Research News: Meadow of dancing brittle stars shows evolution at work

- UWA Research News: 275 million-year-old starfish fossil found in Western Australia

- The West Austalian: Starfish the size of dinner plates discovered at Gascoyne Junction by UWA, Curtin Uni researchers

- EurekaAlert: Meadow of dancing brittle stars shows evolution at work

- Australian Geographic: New species of brittle stars discovered

- Science Daily: Meadow of dancing brittle stars shows evolution at work

- Phys.Org: Meadow of dancing brittle stars shows evolution at work

- Australasian Scientist: Dancing brittle stars tell an ancient tale of life and death in brutal seas

- ABC News: 275-million-year-old starfish-like fossils unearthed in remote inland Western Australia

- GeologyPage: Meadow of dancing brittle stars shows evolution at work

 

Permian Brittle Star afossilhunter
Permian Brittle Stars

 

           
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